1. Articles from Stephen Lawson

    1-16 of 16
    1. 5G progress at Ericsson could help enterprises work worldwide

      The Swedish network giant Ericsson will have a lot of prospective 5G equipment to show to gearheads at Mobile World Congress later this month, but the future cloud capabilities it demonstrates may be just as important for a subscriber’s experience. In addition to fast broadband speeds, Ericsson’s technologies for next-generation networks will be able to guarantee enterprises the same type of service around the world and shift applications to the edge of a network to shrink transmission delays, the company said in an MWC preview on Wednesday.

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    2. Old networks can hobble IoT, even in tech paradise

      IoT isn’t all brand-new, cutting-edge technology. In fact, some of it’s already suffering through painful upgrade cycles.A case in point is the system that tells transit passengers in the tech hub of San Francisco when the next train or bus will arrive. The NextMuni system, based on the third-party platform NextBus, recently began sending out wildly inaccurate forecasts on many lines.

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    3. NetSuite's going global under Oracle's flag

      Lashed to the much bigger ship that is Oracle, cloud software provider NetSuite is setting sail for a new market near you. Until now, the 18-year-old company based in San Mateo, California, has focused on English-speaking countries and Japan. As part of Oracle, it plans to localize its products for many more countries while expanding its data-center capacity, sales operations, partner channel and other assets to reach customers in those new areas.

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    4. IBM pushes to offer IoT from development to production

      The internet of things is so complex that some enterprises would rather turn to one vendor to determine the business case for an IoT deployment, design the system, roll it out, and operate it as a service.At least that’s what IBM believes. The company’s combining several of its products and services into what it calls the IoT Solutions Practice. The move, announced Monday, is designed so customers can find all of IBM’s IoT offerings in one place.

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    5. GE, Bosch and open source could bring more IoT tools

      Partnerships that could shape the internet of things for years are being forged just as enterprises fit IoT into their long-term plans. A majority of organizations have included IoT as part of their strategic plans for the next two to three years, IDC said last week. No one vendor can meet the diverse IoT needs of all those users, so they're joining forces and also trying to foster broader ecosystems. General Electric and Germany's Bosch did both on Monday.

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    6. Companies say IoT matters but don't agree how to secure it

      A majority of enterprises say the internet of things is strategic to their business, but most still take a piecemeal approach to IoT security. Those results from a global IDC survey conducted in July and August reveal both the promise and the growing pains of IoT, a set of technologies that may help many industries but can’t simply be plugged in. The 27-country survey had more than 4,500 respondents, all from organizations with 100 or more employees.

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    7. IoT is now growing faster than smartphones

      If there were any doubt that IoT is for real, one fact ought to dispel it: For the first time, U.S. mobile operators are adding IoT connections to their networks faster than they’re adding phones. In fact, cars alone are getting connected to cellular networks faster than anything else, according to statistics compiled by Chetan Sharma Consulting for the second quarter of this year.

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    8. On many IoT projects, IT shops get left behind

      IT departments are playing second fiddle to operations people as enterprises tune up for the Internet of Things. That’s one of the surprising findings from a survey of people involved in business IoT projects in the U.S. The survey, conducted last month by Technalysis Research, also revealed that monitoring employees is the No. 1 thing companies want to do with the widely hyped technology. Conflict between IT and OT (operations technology) had been brewing before the IoT trend even began, as physical infrastructure was updated with new smarts. 

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    9. As 5G approaches, 3G and 4G are still getting faster

      Most of the excitement at Mobile World Congress this month will be about 5G, which won't officially exist until 2020. But vendors will also show off new ways to speed up the 3G and 4G networks most people use today. That means more than 4G, because while LTE gets a lot of press, older services are more common than you might think. Just over half of the world's mobile subscriptions (51 percent) are for 2G service only, according to Tolaga Research analyst Phil Marshall. Almost one-third are limited to 3G, while only 15 percent are 4G. Even in ...

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    10. Don't rush your company into an IoT app platform

      Enterprises deploying Internet of Things devices and accompanying software don't have to go it alone, but choosing a platform for building your applications is a big decision that's hard to go back on. IoT analyst Dima Tokar adds that caveat when giving tips on what a company should look for in an AEP (application enablement platform), a set of middleware components that can make IoT rollouts easier. On Monday, the MachNation analyst released a report on the changing AEP landscape.

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    11. What we learned about 5G in 2015

      The much-anticipated 5G mobile standard won't be finished until 2020, but the people who'll make it happen were busy throughout 2015 trying to define it. One thing that's clear already is that 5G won't be like 4G. Rather than just making phones and tablets faster, the next generation of mobile technology will be asked to serve many uses, each with different requirements. This was a year for sorting through those demands.

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    12. HP Enterprise joins battle for the edge of IoT

      HPE's Edgeline IoT Systems are gateways for working on data before it crosses a network. The Internet of Things could help some companies save money or even boost sales, and the big names of enterprise tech are lining up to help their customers make the leap. Hewlett Packard Enterprise is in the thick of that pack. On Wednesday in London, it unveiled two gateway devices for gathering and processing data at the edges of IoT networks. The HPE IoT System EL10 and EL20 are available now.

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    13. Intel's latest IoT move heats up the race for low-power networks

      While mobile operators often claim bragging rights to the fastest smartphone connections, another rivalry is heating up around networks that aren't fast at all: Their claim to fame is that they don't suck up power.On Friday, Intel said it would work with cellular heavyweights Ericsson and Nokia to commercialize NB-LTE (Narrow-Band LTE), a variant of the latest cellular technology that uses a small amount of radio spectrum to efficiently carry small amounts of data.

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    14. Google's data centers grow too fast for normal networks, so it builds its own

      Google's data centers grow too fast for normal networks, so it builds its own

      Google has been building its own software-defined data-center networks for 10 years because traditional gear can’t handle the scale of what are essentially warehouse-sized computers. The company hasn’t said much before about that homegrown infrastructure, but one of its networking chiefs provided some details on Wednesday at Open Network Summit and in a blog post. The current network design, which powers all of Google’s data centers, has a maximum capacity of 1.13 petabits per second.

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