1. Articles in category: Cyber Security

    97-120 of 147 « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 »
    1. Does anyone really want the government deciding encryption policy?

      Security and privacy debates are highly nuanced, allowing for much interpretation, balancing acts and differences of opinion. For that reason, I try and be tolerant of a wide range of views on the subject. Every so often, though, some executive says something so divorced from logic and reality that silence is not an option. Enter AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson and his attack on Apple's encryption efforts.

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    2. Why Cloud Computing Will Shake Up Security

      As the curtain opens on 2016, you can expect massive changes in the security landscape. Technology providers such as firewall vendors, switching vendors and others will fade as new solutions better suited to the cloud computing environment emerge. On the flip side, companies that provide encryption and anti-malware technologies will continue to see their fortunes rise because the demand will continue to grow. But to thrive, these vendors must bring out new products and services evolved for cloud computing.

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    3. What the board needs to know about cybersecurity compliance

      Board members are now facing lawsuits after large-scale cybersecurity breaches because the security breakdowns are considered a failure to uphold fiduciary duties. The Department of Justice has recently provided guidelines for cybersecurity awareness for board members. The CIO now has a responsibility to communicate the cybersecurity strategy to board members and make them aware of critical risks to help avoid personal liability.

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    4. Hacker Lexicon: What Are DoS and DDoS Attacks?

      You see them mentioned in the news all the time. DoS and DDoS attacks are on the rise, and they are getting more sophisticated and intense every year. The US government accused Iran of conducting a prolonged series of DDoS against the web sites of Bank of America and other financial institutions, presumably as retaliation for economic sanctions levied against Iran for its nuclear program. Recently DDoS attacks by extortionists have targeted banks in Greece and Sweden. So what are DoS and DDoS attacks?

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    5. Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Twitter urge UK to guarantee encryption in law

      Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Twitter have made a joint submission on the UK’s draft Investigatory Powers Bill that urges the government to guarantee encryption in law. While acknowledging that oral assurances have been made by ministers that encrypted services are not at risk, the group has asked for clarity: We reject any proposals that would require companies to deliberately weaken the security of their products via backdoors, forced decryption, or any other means.

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    6. Google Begins Testing Password-Free Logins

      Google confirmed this morning it’s now testing a new way to sign into your Google account without having to type in a password. Instead, those who have been invited to try this new method of logging in authenticate by responding to a notification sent to their smartphone. The idea is similar to Yahoo’s recently launched “Account Key,” which also offers a password-free means of signing in involving a push notification sent to your phone that then opens an app where you approve the log-in.

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    7. Cybersecurity bill approved, but what does it accomplish?

      It may have been easy for Congress on Friday to approve the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA), despite past controversy around it. This bill does not hike federal spending or impose sweeping regulatory rules. Its main feature is something many firms will be happy to get: liability protection if they share information with the government about cyberthreats and attacks. The White House was expected to sign the bill, and possibly upset a long list of tech firms, including Apple, Google and Facebook, who are worried about private information getting into government hands.

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    8. Symantec to say goodbye to passwords with biometric technology

      "The password is weak and crap," said Nick Savvides, Symantec ANZ business manager of information protection. Speaking recently to media in Singapore, Savvides went on to say that having passwords -- no matter how complicated they are -- is not the ideal way for companies to protect themselves against online threats, as cybercriminals are getting better at what they do. In an effort to improve security, Symantec will be releasing a host of capabilities next year that will feature biometric technology instead of relying on passwords.

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    9. Why security tech will gobble up more of your tech budget in 2016

      According to a study released last month, the cost of cybercrime rose 19 percent in the past year, and the average company is now spending 82 percent more defending itself than it did in 2009. And yet that’s still not enough. State-sponsored actors have increased their attacks on corporate targets, and the sophistication of financially-driven cybercriminals has increased exponentially in the past few years.

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    10. Humility, Accountability And Creative Thinking Can Fix IT Security

      The state of cybersecurity has reached full-blown systemic failure. The narrative goes something like this: Companies are spending massive amounts of money on technologies that don’t seem to be living up to their marketing messages. According to Gartner, $80 billion will be invested in IT security products in 2015 alone. While it’s always easier to point out the problem — and every vendor is doing it in spades right now — I believe a solution is within reach. Here’s why. Several psychological, technological and market shifts are now intersecting with a more accountable, collaborative and trustworthy security ecosystem in ...

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    11. The NSA's mass US phone surveillance ends tonight

      The National Security Agency's long-running mass phone surveillance program is coming to an end. As promised, the USA Freedom Act will forbid the NSA from indiscriminately collecting Americans' call metadata at midnight on November 29th. Agents will have to get court orders to collect data from telecoms regarding specific people or groups, and then only for six months at a time -- they can't just scoop up everything in case something useful turns up. The NSA will still have access to five years' worth of legacy data through February 29th, but that's as far as its access will ...

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    12. What are your APIs really worth?

      Since their debut 15 years ago, application programming interfaces (APIs) have grown into one of the foundational building blocks of modern application development. Now that we live in a world of microservices, how do you value the APIs that you're putting out there, whether it's the price of an external service or the worth of an internal one?

       

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    13. How Lockheed Martin, Cisco and PWC manage cybersecurity

      Cybersecurity remains a top priority for companies in all industries. The reason is clear. Criminals and other parties have access to inexpensive tools and training to attack companies and governments. The New York Times reported on the rise of ransomware earlier in 2015. This type of malicious software encrypts a user’s data and demands a payment to release it (or the data will be destroyed).

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    14. Customers at Sheraton, Westin, other hotels hit by data-stealing hack attack

      Starwood Hotels and Resorts, the company behind nearly a dozen hotel brands, says that more than 50 of its locations suffered from a malware attack on point-of-sale systems. Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide said this week that point-of-sale systems at more than 50 of its hotels had been infected with malicious software. The malware, installed at gift shops, restaurants and other locations, let hackers make off with payment card data, including cardholder name, card number, security code and expiration date.

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    15. Organizations sloppy about securing privileged accounts

      Companies' haphazard processes for managing administrative or other privileged accounts are putting them at risk of security breaches, according to a new global security survey.

      The survey, conducted by Dimensional Research and sponsored by Dell, found that 83 percent of respondents face numerous challenges with managed privileged accounts and administrative passwords.

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    16. Strong data security is not optional

      According to the Ponemon Institute’s 10th annual Cost of Data Breach Study, the average consolidated total cost of a data breach is now $6.53 million for a U.S. organization, an 11% increase since last year. The study also found that the average cost per lost or stolen record containing sensitive and confidential information rose from $201 in 2014 to $217. These facts alone should encourage every company to tighten its data security policies and capabilities, but there’s more.

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    17. Democratizing secure payments: How startups and entrepreneurs can offer customers ironclad payment security

      There are several options for enabling secure mobile payments on your website or native app, but the technology is complex and the regulatory requirements for doing so are daunting, so you’ll want to do a little homework to find the solution that’s right for you. To determine the best fit for your needs, keep in mind the fundamental goals of providing security and ease of use, for both you and your customers.

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    18. Booming crypto ransomware industry employs new tricks to befuddle victims

      Ransomware that uses strong cryptography to hold entire hard drives' worth of data hostage keeps getting nastier, as criminals attempt to find new ways to extort more people into paying increasingly hefty ransoms to recover their files. A case in point is Chimera, a relative newcomer to the crypto ransom racket that targets primarily businesses. In an attempt to turn up the pressure on infected victims, the malware threatens to publish their pictures and other personal data somewhere on the Internet unless a ransom of $638 in bitcoins is paid.

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    19. Will AI Be Smart Enough To Protect Us From Online Threats?

      According to some estimates, the global cost of cybercrime in 2013 was $113 billion. The actual cost may vary, but whatever the true figure, it’s a spicy meatball. Human beings really aren’t the best at computer security. Here’s an idea: Let’s set our computers to defend our computers. Let’s build a computer strong enough, fast enough and smart enough to defend us all from hackers on its own. Can we do this? Probably not; and if it turns out that we can… we’ll end up in a be-careful-what-you-wish-for scenario. Let’s explore why artificial ...

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    20. Why IoT Security Is So Critical

      Twenty years ago, if you told me my phone could be used to steal the password to my email account or to take a copy of my fingerprint data, I would’ve laughed at you and said you watch too much James Bond. But today, if you tell me that hackers with malicious intents can use my toaster to break into my Facebook account, I will panic and quickly pull the plug from the evil appliance. Welcome to the era of the Internet of Things (IoT), where digitally connected devices are encroaching on every aspect of our lives, including our ...

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    21. Breach analytics: The next billion-dollar investment opportunity

      Researchers at Verizon noted in the Data Breach Investigations Report 2015 that the volume of breaches rose by 55 percent overall in 2014, citing the average time necessary to detect these incidents at roughly 200 days. Quite simply, the days of using mere prevention are long gone. Breach analytics solutions – which assume that attackers have already found a way into the environment, monitor for telltale signs of such activities, and then investigate those behaviors to inform response – are rapidly becoming the next must-have toolset.

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