1. Articles in category: Application Developement

    73-96 of 101 « 1 2 3 4 5 »
    1. What are your APIs really worth?

      Since their debut 15 years ago, application programming interfaces (APIs) have grown into one of the foundational building blocks of modern application development. Now that we live in a world of microservices, how do you value the APIs that you're putting out there, whether it's the price of an external service or the worth of an internal one?

       

      Read Full Article
    2. What Microsoft's new developer strategy means for CIOs

      Connect 2015, Microsoft’s online developer event being held this week, is crammed with announcements of new developer tools and sneak peaks at the future of Visual Studio and C#. If you take a step back from the flood of details, though, there’s a clear direction emerging. Microsoft’s cross-platform, open source development and devops tools are maturing. That matters more to enterprises than a growing list of free tools.

      Read Full Article
    3. APIs have changed the game

      In competition, speed dominates.  The mantra that you win by “providing the most value at the least cost” isn’t complete until you add “in the least amount of time.” But at times disruptive innovation changes the game. Even the best practitioners of the old ways can’t match those who embrace the new. Modern APIs are driving one such change now. But we’ll better appreciate the implications if we consider this in light of a previous change of similar magnitude.

      Read Full Article
    4. If everyone is now a software company, should they operate more like software companies?

      Companies are relying on software for just about everything, to the point that everyone has become, to some degree, a software company. But are these companies doing enough to ensure the quality and performance of their software? Now that everyone is in the software business, is there enough attention being paid to this prime product? Unfortunately, not yet. Perhaps there are lessons that need to be learned from the technology industry in designing, producing and securing software. At least 63% say that software companies have their own way of operating, which needs to be examined and emulated where appropriate.

      Read Full Article
    5. Why you need a project governor

      Project management is regularly discussed in business publications. A simple Google search will reveal a plethora of articles with suggestions for improving one’s project management skills. It is surprising, though, that a very closely related topic – project governance gets limited press from industry experts. The Project governor’s role is critical to the success of a project. Research signals that IT governance can improve the returns on IT investment by about 40 percent.

      Read Full Article
    6. Can citizen developers bring shadow IT into the light?

      Citizen developers can produce valuable businesses applications quickly, but is speed to market worth the risk of security and compliance considerations flying out of the window? "If citizen development is done properly in partnership with the IT department, then that can work," says Gartner.  "There is a distinction between people who develop unbeknownst to IT – we call that shadow IT – and citizen developers who work in partnership with IT." Gartner expects that 50 percent of companies without formalized control and management of citizen development policies will encounter substantial data, process integrity and security vulnerabilities by 2020

      Read Full Article
    7. Coding In The Cloud Era Demands A Structural Rethink To Bake In Security And Privacy

      Protecting privacy in an age of big data, cloud processing and increasingly interconnected digital services demands a structural shift in how software is developed.  That’s the view of academic Jean Yang, who holds a PhD from MIT and has been conducting research around data privacy for several years – including devising her own programming language, called Jeeves, which centralizes how privacy policies are handled in order to take the burden of correct enforcement off the shoulders of individual programmers.

      Read Full Article
    8. CIO seeks to build the ‘killer app’ for logistics

      It didn't take long for Tim Kutz to shake things up at Echo Global Logistics. Within a month of joining the freight broker as CIO in May, he moved the IT managers out of their offices and into an open seating arrangement. The move was as much a mind game as it was a practical solution to foster better collaboration. Kutz, who typically arrives at the company's Chicago office at 6:30 a.m. and doesn't leave until 6:30 p.m., wanted his colleagues to see his work ethic.

      Read Full Article
    9. Bottom up vs. top down: How to scale agile

      The biggest, most important end-goal of agile is adaptability. As companies grow larger, however, this goal becomes harder and harder to achieve. There are more teams to mobilize and more communication to manage. That’s where the idea of ‘scaled agile’ enters the picture. Large companies need a thoughtful, impactful, and streamlined way to encourage agile adoption across teams and people. 

      Read Full Article
    10. What makes a DevOps unicorn?

      An unknown person once said, "Sometimes the only thing that people see is what you did, when in fact they should be looking at why you did it." This is a critical perspective when it comes to understanding DevOps unicorns such as Netflix, Etsy, Amazon, Facebook, Google, LinkedIn, ING group and a handful of other companies that are known as leaders in their use of optimized DevOps practices, and organizational and business outcomes.

      Read Full Article
    11. Scrum’s co-creator talks about the framework’s transformational effect

      Jeff Sutherland is one of the inventors of the scrum development process. He also created, along with Alistair Cockburn, Ken Schwaber and others, the Agile Manifesto in 2001. He's currently CEO of Scrum, Inc., and a speaker, author and thought leader in software development. Sutherland sat down with CIO.com's Sharon Florentine at Agile Alliance 2015 to talk about the past, present and future of scrum and agile.

      Read Full Article
    12. BlackBerry Drops $425M to Try to Lure Corporate Clients Back

      BlackBerry is trying to regain its footing by managing devices instead of selling them. Today BlackBerry announced that it has agreed to acquire mobile security company Good Technology for $425 million in cash. Good’s technology will complement BlackBerry’s existing BlackBerry Enterprise Server (BES) product, a tool for managing corporate devices including BlackBerry handsets as well as Android and iOS gadgets, and for encrypting email and messages.

      Read Full Article
    13. How to make money from open source software

      Last month we looked at the argument that the open source business model is flawed because selling maintenance and support subscriptions doesn't provide companies with enough revenue to  differentiate their products from the underlying open source software or to compete with the sales and marketing efforts of proprietary software companies. "Peter Levine talked about conventional open source business models using the GPL license where you can't monetize software so you struggle to raise money to invest in innovation," Raskin says. But he points out that companies can use other open source licenses which do allow the monetization of ...

      Read Full Article
    14. Reinventing outsourcing through agile principles

      Organisations are starting to use agile principles to reinvent the outsourcing selection process, with some excellent results. The Agile Manifesto, originally designed for software development, encourages collaborative, cross-disciplinary teams to move rapidly, prioritise working services over exhaustive documentation, and maintain flexibility to change. By adopting these principles, companies have an opportunity to extract much-needed value from an otherwise costly and time-consuming endeavour

      Read Full Article
    15. Think you're agile? You're probably wrong

      Businesses worldwide overestimate their agility and need to educate themselves on the benefits of platform-as-a-service (PaaS) offerings, according to the Oracle Cloud Agility study released today by Oracle. "This study shows there is something of a disconnect between the respondents' perception of the business in general and the actual reality of their IT infrastructure," says Robert Shimp, group vice president, Oracle. While a majority of businesses believe they are agile, many organizations cannot flexibly manage workloads or rapidly develop, test and launch new applications, leaving them poorly prepared to deal with competitive threats.

      Read Full Article
    16. 6 Reasons Hardware Is The New Software

      For many years, hardware has lagged behind software because of price, specialization, and the speed of innovation. Recently though, more startups are taking up the challenge thanks to the Internet of Things. The strongest startups have mitigated those risks through attentive, quick turn manufacturers, robust over-the-air update systems, and comprehensive tools used to know exactly what’s happening across data exchanges. The gap between hardware and software development is closing and the market is ripe for connected devices to take the market by storm.

      Read Full Article
    17. Office 365 Tops Business Cloud Apps, Study Finds

      The "mobile first, cloud first" vision is paying off for Microsoft, as indicated by the inagural Businesses @ Work report from identity and mobility management firm Okta. According to the research, Microsoft's Office 365 service has proven most popular among a lineup of 4,000 business apps. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has repeatedly emphasized the importance of mobile and cloud technologies in driving the company's future and supporting its new corporate mission of "empowering every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more."

      Read Full Article
    18. Data security, the achilles heel of DevOps

      Survey finds speed and quality in software delivery are the name of the game in DevOps. But does data get put at risk? There has been overwhelming momentum to the practice of DevOps in recent years, and for good reason.  However, it takes data to test and ensure that everything is running properly, and all too often that data comes out of live production systems. Once data leaves the data center, there's less assurance that it is being managed in a secure way. 

      Read Full Article
    19. Google to Reorganize Into New Company Called 'Alphabet'

      The search giant is breaking into smaller units and adopting an umbrella-company strategy. Google Inc. says it is creating a new operating structure under a newly formed umbrella company it is calling Alphabet Inc. Co-founder and current CEO Larry Page will lead the new company, while Sergey Brin, the other co-founder, will serve as president. Google itself will be an operating unit and get a new CEO: Sundar Pichai, who had been running Android and Chrome.

      Read Full Article
    20. How to move to DevOps to drive open networks

      Many of the topics and discussions at the recent Open Networking User Group (ONUG) conference emphasized one very important shift in the networking industry: leading IT organizations are moving to a DevOps organizational structure and eliminating the traditional silos of server, storage and networking in favor of cloud centric, cross-functional teams. Moreover, these changes in IT organizational structure are having a significant impact on networking requirements (e.g.

      Read Full Article
    21. 4 Ways To Cut App Development And Maintenance Costs

      A managed services or fixed-fee outsourcing model for application development and maintenance can ultimately yield major savings for IT organizations that embrace it. A well-planned managed service delivery contract for application maintenance can yield a 25 to 45 percent cost reduction over staff augmentation in the first year alone, according Steven Kirz, managing director with outsourcing consultancy Pace Harmon, with many organizations seeing 50 to 75 percent savings after five years.

      Read Full Article
    22. CIOs need to reboot supplier relationships

      While large amounts of IT spending still goes to maintaining systems from the big four software providers - IBM, Microsoft, Oracle and SAP - all the real innovation seems to be coming from elsewhere. At the same time, experts are talking about "bimodal" or two-speed IT, where back-office IT systems that support corporate "systems of record" applications, are separated from a more agile, customer-facing IT function, working directly with the business on social, cloud, big data and mobile initiatives - so-called systems of engagement. As a result, what it means to be in IT is changing. 

      Read Full Article
    23. The obstacles to software-as-a-service adoption in banking

      Security is seen as a top obstacle to using software-as-a-service (SaaS) products for three-quarters of business technology decision makers at banks, according to a global survey. Banks have adopted cloud relatively slowly in comparison with firms of similar sizes in other sectors, and Forrester’s latest research reveals why.

      Read Full Article
    73-96 of 101 « 1 2 3 4 5 »
  1. Popular Articles