1. Articles from computerworld.com

  2. 25-48 of 117 « 1 2 3 4 5 »
    1. Meet Apache Spot, a new open-source project for cybersecurity

      Hard on the heels of the discovery of the largest known data breach in history, Cloudera and Intel on Wednesday announced that they've donated a new open-source project to the Apache Software Foundation with a focus on using big data analytics and machine learning for cybersecurity. Originally created by Intel and launched as the Open Network Insight (ONI) project in February, the effort is now called Apache Spot and has been accepted into the ASF Incubator.

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    2. Industrial IoT inches toward consensus on security

      IoT is complex, fast-growing and often intertwined with systems that govern things like water and power. That makes IoT security a critical requirement, but it’s one that’s not necessarily well understood.The Industrial Internet Consortium, a group that includes some of the biggest players in the internet of things, took action on Monday to clear the air. It rolled out the IISF (Industrial Internet Security Framework), a set of best practices to help developers and users assess risks and defend against them.

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    3. Oracle pushes hybrid by letting customers rent cloud hardware

      One of the big issues facing public cloud vendors is persuading companies to take on-premises workloads and move them to a public cloud data center. Oracle is trying to enable that shift with a new set of products that allow customers to get the same hardware that Oracle runs in its data centers behind their own firewalls. Executive Chairman Larry Ellison unveiled the Big Data@Customer and Exadata@Customer machines on Sunday, building on the company's Cloud@Customer hardware offering.

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    4. Chrome OS gets cryptographically verified enterprise device management

      Companies will now be able to cryptographically validate the identity of Chrome OS devices connecting to their networks and verify that those devices conform to their security policies. Google on Thursday announced a new feature and administration API called Verified Access. The API relies on digital certificates stored in the hardware-based Trusted Platform Modules (TPMs) present in every Chrome OS device to certify that the security state of those devices has not been altered.

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    5. Chase Mobile grasps the obvious about biometrics

      With little fanfare, JPMorgan Chase on Monday (Sept. 12) reversed its security position on its mobile app, removing the need to type in a password once a customer has already been authenticated by either Apple's Touch ID or an Android biometric scan. Before Monday, Chase customers could log in using a biometric scan and see things such as balances but needed to authenticate themselves again with a password for transferring funds or making a payment.

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    6. The new Dell Technologies: 6 things you need to know

      Dell and EMC have completed their $67 billion merger to create Dell Technologies, the world's largest privately held technology company. It's a historic day, far from the PC company that sponsored the "Dude, I've bought a Dell" campaign. The new company will sell PCs, servers, storage, networking and software products. It has an impressive list of assets including Dell's PC and servers, EMC storage, VMWare, RSA, Wyse, Force10 and the Pivotal software and Boomi cloud services.

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    7. The Future of Networking is in the Cloud.

      By the year 2020 IDC expects more than 60 percent of all IT spending will be on cloud-based services. Given that, it’s pretty clear that the network of tomorrow is going to be largely cloud-based. As with all things IT, it’ll be a gradual evolution. This post, offers four tips on how to gradually and effectively migrate aging IT infrastructure and applications to the cloud.

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    8. Median IT wage is $10K higher for men than women

      Men in IT earn a median of $82,370 a year compared to $72,035 for women, according to new data by the U.S. Census Bureau. The wage gap is perhaps is the most disquieting finding in a study of 2014 data by the Bureau, which also found that IT workers are younger than those in other occupations, more likely to have an advanced degree and more often work from home.

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    9. Google says its databases are enterprise ready

      Google is continuing its campaign to entice enterprises to its public cloud platform by rolling out database services stable enough to serve businesses' production workloads.To that end, the company announced the general availability of three database-focused products: the second generation of Cloud SQL, its managed database service; Cloud Datastore, its NoSQL document database; and Cloud Bigtable, its NoSQL database service that powers products like Gmail.

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    10. With Amazon Kinesis Analytics, devs can analyze real-time data with SQL

      Amazon launched a new tool on Thursday aimed at helping developers build applications that offer insights from a firehose of data in real time. Kinesis Analytics will let users set up SQL queries that run on data that's constantly updating, expanding the reach of the popular data analysis language beyond traditional database applications.

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    11. IoT is now growing faster than smartphones

      If there were any doubt that IoT is for real, one fact ought to dispel it: For the first time, U.S. mobile operators are adding IoT connections to their networks faster than they’re adding phones. In fact, cars alone are getting connected to cellular networks faster than anything else, according to statistics compiled by Chetan Sharma Consulting for the second quarter of this year.

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    12. IT asset management: How to be efficient

      Business leaders will tell you that overseeing a company is undoubtedly risky. But there are ways to mitigate risk. IT inventory administration is key to businesses managing their systems more effectively and, if performed routinely, can save time and money by avoiding unnecessary asset purchases. To be effective, there are two distinct competencies that every organization should have: compliance process and an effective integrated business tool for the collection of asset information.

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    13. Still afraid of data? Let’s start with the fundamentals

      Is your website data-driven or data-informed? If “data-less” is a more accurate description, let’s take a step back and look at what it takes for sites to adopt a data-driven mindset and strategy. Quay Quinn-Settel, director of marketing at CollegeHumor.com, believes that when an organization struggles to find value in data or fails to use it, it’s either because it hasn’t established clear goals and KPIs or its KPIs are disconnected from its business objectives.

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    14. IBM creates artificial neurons from phase change memory for cognitive computing

      IBM scientists have created artificial neurons and synapses using phase change memory (PCM) that mimics the brain's cognitive learning capability.It is the first time the researchers were able to create what they described as "randomly spiking neurons" using phase-change materials to store and process data. The discovery is a milestone in developing energy-sipping and highly dense neuro networks that could be used for cognitive computing applications.

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    15. Density aims to end queueing for hospitals, homeless shelters, coffee shops and elsewhere

      If you are interested in IoT, today's news about the launch of Density, a new people-counting sensor that has been created by alums from Apple and the Y Combinator accelerator, should catch your attention. Density is a small sensor that anonymously measures how busy a location is in real-time. In practice, with the device mounted above an entryway, a business can use the Density API to access how many people have visited.

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    16. SMS-based two-factor authentication may be headed out the door

      SMS messaging for two-factor authentication might become a thing of the past. A federal agency is discouraging its use. The National Institute of Standards and Technology is pushing for the change. The latest draft of its Digital Authentication Guideline, updated on Monday, warns that SMS messages can be intercepted or redirected, making them vulnerable to hacking.

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    17. With Yahoo buy, Verizon hopes to stay competitive in digital ad market

      After months of rumors, Verizon announced Monday that it is buying Yahoo's core business for $4.83 billion in a deal designed to make Verizon competitive as a global mobile media and digital advertising company. Analysts said the move primarily will help Verizon remain competitive against AT&T. Both, however, will trail behind Google and Facebook, which control the bulk of the $185 billion digital ad ecosystem.

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    18. The truth about bug finders: They're essentially useless

      Today's popular bug finders catch only about two percent of the vulnerabilities lurking in software code, researchers have found, despite the millions of dollars companies spend on them each year. Bug finders are commonly used by software engineers to root out problems in code that could turn into vulnerabilities. They'll typically report back how many bugs they found -- what you don't know is how many were missed, leaving success rates an open mystery.

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