1. Articles from computerworld.com

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    1. 5 disruptors to keep on your radar

      What should be on your radar screen as we head into the new year? The 182 IT professionals who participated in the Computerworld Forecast 2016 survey singled out these five potentially disruptive technologies and trends: the rise of DevOps, virtualization 2.0, carbon-reducing technologies, the evolution of the IT-marketing alignment, and a sharpening of IT's focus on the customer experience. Here's a look at what our survey revealed about each of those emerging areas.

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    2. Alternative processors tapped to fulfill supercomputing's need for speed

      As world powers compete to build the fastest supercomputers, more attention is being paid to alternative processing technologies as a way to add more horsepower to such systems. One thing is clear: It is becoming prohibitive to build blazing CPU-only supercomputers, due to power and space constraints. That's where powerful coprocessors step in -- the processors work in conjuction with CPUs to conduct complex calculations in a power-efficient manner.

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    3. Strong data security is not optional

      According to the Ponemon Institute’s 10th annual Cost of Data Breach Study, the average consolidated total cost of a data breach is now $6.53 million for a U.S. organization, an 11% increase since last year. The study also found that the average cost per lost or stolen record containing sensitive and confidential information rose from $201 in 2014 to $217. These facts alone should encourage every company to tighten its data security policies and capabilities, but there’s more.

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    4. Smartphone mobile payments: An end-of-year level-set

      Back in January, Apple CEO Tim Cook declared 2015 “the year of Apple Pay.” While I like his enthusiasm, I think we are a long way away from declaring any one technology -- or tech company -- the leader. The mobile payment industry has changed dramatically and permanently (largely as a result of Apple Pay), resulting in a wealth of new opportunities for mobile payments, and along with it, a whole bunch of confusion.

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    5. The pace of innovation is accelerating, but the impact on jobs is a question mark

      Predictions about future job growth are getting harder to make. Innovation is happening so quickly in so many areas that it's making Moore's Law look sluggish. Bank of America Merrill Lynch, in a new study, looks at the innovations ahead and quantifies what it sees as the growth rates of various technologies. But when it comes to the impact on jobs, the bank's researchers are scratching their heads like everyone else. There is worry, in this comprehensive report, that automation could upend the U.S. government's job growth estimates.

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    6. Dropbox woos large businesses with new Enterprise offering

      Large enterprises have a new Dropbox product tailored for them that the company unveiled at its user conference in San Francisco on Wednesday. Dropbox Enterprise is built on the foundation of Dropbox Business, the company’s product aimed at organizations. Companies that buy it will get access to all of the features in Dropbox’s business-facing offering, plus special capabilities like the ability to prevent people with certain email address domains from using them with a Dropbox personal account.

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    7. The secret to first-rate mobile apps for customers? Iterate, iterate, iterate

      Take four heavy-hitting brands -- Allstate, Hilton, United Airlines and American Express, all of which place a premium on customer loyalty and retention. Mix in the customer-pleasing form of mobile devices and the ever-advancing function of mobile apps. What you get are four organizations using mobile to connect better with customers by leveraging their well-organized IT structures and well-skilled IT staffers.

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    8. When it comes to security, trust but verify

      It's time to rethink a bunch of security truisms, Gartner analysts said at the company's annual Symposium/IT Expo here this week. The security rules companies have relied on for decades are ready for retirement. These include: Prevention is better than cure, humans are the weakest link, and access should be limited to just an employee needs to do his or her job. These old saws have been "exploded" by today's tech trends, said Tom Scholtz, Gartner research vice president.

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    9. How News Corp is uniting 10 business units and 25,000 employees in a global IT push

      Embarking on a new IT project is a major undertaking no matter what your company's scope or size, but when you're News Corp -- with 10 business units and 25,000 employees around the globe -- it's not for the faint of heart. That, however, was exactly the challenge that faced Dominic Shine less than a year after he joined the media conglomerate as global CIO.

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    10. Global privacy advisory market topping $3B

      How much do companies around the world spend each year on data privacy services to fix the problems we read about in the headlines every day? Nobody as far as I can tell has published an answer to this question. So this month I set out to pull together the best available data points on the market. What did I find out? The first discovery was that you need to define what you’re estimating. Because no one before Computerworld has sized up the privacy sector, that task falls to us.

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    11. A new tool for pricing used IT equipment

      An electronics recycler has created an IT products database representing 9,000 manufacturers and 11 million equipment models. The products range from consumer to business equipment, such as network storage devices, routers, switches, as well as servers, PCs and office machines. The database, called the Sage BlueBook, was launched this week in beta and will remain free to use. It will give prices based on condition, including non-working.

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    12. This new 3D XPoint memory could last forever

      Intel and Micron this week unveiled a new type of memory they plan to mass produce that is purportedly 1,000 times faster than NAND flash and has 1,000 times the endurance. One thousand times the endurance would be about one million erase-write cycles, meaning the new memory would last pretty much forever. By comparison, today's NAND flash lasts for between 3,000 and 10,000 erase-write cycles.

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    13. IDC cuts forecast for mobile management software sales

      It still sees $2.9 billion in sales in 2019 Sales of mobile management software will grow at a slower pace over the next few years but will still top $2.9 billion in 2019, according to IDC’s latest forecast. The projected annual sales growth by multiple enterprise mobility management software (EMM) vendors globally will slide from last year's 27% growth rate to a projected annual increase of less than 10% in 2019, IDC said in this month's forecast.

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    14. The worst thing about tech bubbles isn't what you may think

      You may recall how the last tech bubble 15 years ago resulted in staggering market losses, numerous failed start-ups and increasing IT unemployment. Less noticed was the bubble's eerie correlation to undergraduate enrollments in computer science. As the NASDAQ increased, so did computer science and computer engineering enrollments. When the NASDAQ lost half its value in 2000, within a few years computer science enrollments also fell about 50%. Today, enrollments are again spiking right along with the stock market.

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    15. 4 Ways To Cut App Development And Maintenance Costs

      A managed services or fixed-fee outsourcing model for application development and maintenance can ultimately yield major savings for IT organizations that embrace it. A well-planned managed service delivery contract for application maintenance can yield a 25 to 45 percent cost reduction over staff augmentation in the first year alone, according Steven Kirz, managing director with outsourcing consultancy Pace Harmon, with many organizations seeing 50 to 75 percent savings after five years.

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    16. The more customers Microsoft adds to Office 365, the less it makes from each subscriber

      3M more consumers take to 'rent-not-buy' Office, but per-subscriber revenue falls under $50 for the first time The more consumers that Microsoft puts on its Office 365 subscription rolls, the less it makes from each customer, data the company disclosed Tuesday showed. Even though Microsoft has increased subscriptions by double digits for six straight quarters, the average per-subscriber revenue has continued to decline, and for the first time fell under $50.

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    17. The Secret to IT Business Alignment

      The Secret to IT Business Alignment

      In my interviews of CIOs, they have told me that connecting what IT is doing to business strategy remains their highest priority, even above things like improving technical orchestration and overall process excellence. Being a CIO today is clearly more about business alignment than technology alignment. One CIO I spoke with recently said that this means that “CIOs and their teams need to understand their firm’s business problems almost as well as they understand their implementation of information technology.” I couldn’t agree more!

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    18. OPM: The worst hack of all time

      OPM: The worst hack of all time

      The federal government personnel security breach is bigger and worse than you can imagine Hi, my name is Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols and I had a security clearance in the 1980s. Because of that, my personal records are likely to have been revealed by the Office of Personnel Management hack. Big deal, right? What could be so important about my 30-year-old records that it would matter to me today? Oh, let me think.

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    19. Oracle goes all in on cloud services

      Oracle goes all in on cloud services

      Oracle's transition from cloud critic to cloud convert is complete. The company launched a raft of new services Monday that it claims will provide enterprises with all the tools they need to run their operations in the cloud. "We're now able to call our cloud services complete. With today's announcement, you can now move all your applications out of the data center and into the Oracle cloud," Chairman and CTO Larry Ellison said during an event at Oracle's headquarters.

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